Skip to Content
News

Land Back: Over 500 Acres of Ancestral Territory in North L.A. Returned to Fernandeño Tataviam Band of Mission Indians

The Tribe’s history is deeply interwoven into L.A. County and beyond. Its land once spanned more than 1.5 million acres, extending from the Antelope Valley to the Pacific Ocean. By 1900, the Tribe was rendered “landless,” with their territory reduced to zero through unjust land dispossession by the United States.

12:30 PM PST on January 9, 2024

In a historic move, the Fernandeño Tataviam Band of Mission Indians tribe announced that more than 500 acres in northern L.A. county has been donated back to the Tribe.

“We are deeply grateful to Land Veritas and Tracey Brownfield for reconnecting us to our ancestral territory,” said Rudy Ortega, Jr., president of the Fernandeño Tataviam Band of Mission Indians. “The significance of this donation goes beyond property ownership. It’s a restoration of heritage and a commitment to environmental stewardship.”

Land Veritas is a woman-owned, California-based mitigation bank operator active in the environmental services sector since 2010. The firm owns two mitigation banks totaling over 4,500 acres in Southern California.

“Protecting this land and preserving its natural splendor from development have been personal priorities for me,” said Land Veritas president Tracey Brownfield. “I firmly believe there’s no better steward or protector of this land than the Tribe. Their profound respect for the environment and cultural legacy makes them the most deserving custodians of this cherished landscape.”

The Tataviam Land Conservancy intends to explore ways to further preserve the land in northern Los Angeles County adjacent to and beyond an existing environmental mitigation bank, including a permanent conservation easement. A small portion of the acreage includes unpaved roads and a building pad that the Tribe plans to use for educational instruction.

The Tribe’s history is deeply interwoven into L.A. County and beyond. Their land once spanned more than 1.5 million acres, extending from the Antelope Valley to the Pacific Ocean. By 1900, the Tribe was rendered “landless,” with their territory reduced to zero through unjust land dispossession by the United States government.

This announcement builds upon the Tribe’s recent historic agreement with California State Parks to formalize cooperation and collaboration in managing and protecting natural and cultural resources and interpreting state parks within the Tribe’s ancestral lands.

Stay in touch

Sign up for our free newsletter

More from L.A. TACO

Justice 8 Supporters Feel Defeat At Latest Ruling. Enamorado Reported to Be Bleeding While Jailed

Enamorado's attorney alleges, "He is not getting the treatment he deserves for what is a valid medical reason.” Nonetheless, the supporters for The Justice 8 are bracing themselves to keep fighting.

February 20, 2024

West Hollywood’s Outdoor ‘Consumption Lounge’ Is a One-Of-Its-Kind Sneak Peek Into the Future of Dispensaries

Come take a look as the L.A. TACO team tours and enjoys a private tree-house cabana at The Woods dispensary, the only consumption lounge of its kind in L.A. County. It was a great day of "work" we'll never forget.

February 20, 2024

What to Eat This Weekend: ‘Sea-Cuterie,’ Al Pastor Rigatoni, and Oxtail Curry Pizza

Plus, a new spot to get huitlacoche quesadillas—with cheese—in the San Fernando Valley and a new delivery-only bento box to order in.

February 16, 2024

The Nug Report: Lemon Drop by LAX Packs

We found that Lemon Drop pairs well with a cappuccino for an extra jolt and makes for a good “first smoke of the day.” Or, if you have the budget, an afternoon lounging with exotic parrots in the back patio of The WOODS, actor and cannabis OG Woody Harrelson’s consumption lounge.

February 16, 2024

Long Beach’s 100-Year-Old Bar Goes Through More Than 450 Pickled Eggs a Day

"This place is a church, everyone respects this place."

February 16, 2024
See all posts