Skip to Content
News

This is How Much Street Drugs Cost in L.A. Right Now, According to LAPD’s Drug Price List

These are the prices for drugs in the L.A. area, according to a list that the LAPD may have accidentally sent to L.A. TACO. Marked “law enforcement sensitive,” the list includes wholesale, as well as “street,” prices for roughly a dozen varieties of uppers, downers, hallucinogens, and prescription medications.

3:19 PM PDT on August 15, 2023

    A list of drug prices.

    Prices for drugs in Los Angeles according to the Los Angeles High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area program’s drug price list. (via LAPD)

    Ten dollars for a “balloon” of Mexican “black tar heroin.” 

    Ninety dollars for a gram of ketamine. 

    Two hundred dollars for a peyote plant. 

    These are the prices for drugs in the L.A. area, according to a list that the Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD) may have accidentally sent to L.A. TACO.

    Marked “law enforcement sensitive,” the list includes wholesale, as well as “street,” prices for roughly a dozen varieties of uppers, downers, hallucinogens, and prescription medications.

    The prices are based on “undercover narcotic operations” led by the L.A. CLEAR Watch Center, a coalition of local law enforcement agencies.

    The drug price list was sent to an L.A. TACO reporter working on a story about the LAPD appearing to inflate the price of methamphetamine seized during drug raids.

    Multiple harm reduction experts, meth users, and meth addiction outreach volunteers told L.A. TACO that the drug usually costs around $20-$40 per gram on the streets. Meanwhile, the LAPD’s estimates for the price of methamphetamine—a notoriously inexpensive drug that can be made from household chemicals—have exceeded $150 per gram when broken down to a per gram cost.

    Law enforcement agencies are notorious for inflating the valuations of drugs by using a “street value” price rather than a wholesale value, but the LAPD’s estimates for the price of meth are significantly higher than even those numbers cited by other local law enforcement agencies.

    When an L.A. TACO reporter reached out to LAPD Chief Michel Moore about this story and asked what he thought of the estimations, Chief Moore defended the valuations and CC’d several LAPD officers on his response. 

    “Attached is the price list provided by HIDTA [the High Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas program] as it relates to current trends,” Lillian Carranza, LAPD Assistant Commander, wrote in response to Chief Moore’s email, seemingly without realizing that an L.A. TACO reporter was included on the email chain. “However, the street price is determined by many factors (purity, potency, supply, demand, wholesale, mid level, distance to source etc.).” 

    A gram of meth costs $20, according to HIDTA’s report, and a pound costs around $700.

    The LAPD commander declined to confirm if she intended to send us the report. 

    The High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area program (HIDTA) is a Regan-era initiative created by congress to provide assistance to local law enforcement “operating in areas determined to be critical drug-trafficking regions of the United States.”

    According to HIDTA’s price list, a single fentanyl pill can cost as little as 30 cents when purchased in quantities of 50,000 pills or more. While a single fluid ounce of Codeine or Gamma Hydroxybutyrate (also known as “the date rape” drug) cost upwards of $95 per fluid ounce.

    Undercover fentanyl pill operations have increased in the last year nearly 50 percent, according to the report.

    The drug price list also notes that “kilos of ecstasy powder (Molly) were reported for the first time this quarter.” And it also includes “NEW!” prices for quarter pounds of meth ($300-400) and half ounces of shrooms ($120).

    The report also includes a link to a survey. 

    “Thank you for participating in our LA CLEAR/LA HIDTA Intelligence Product Survey. Your feedback is important to us for improving our services. There are only three questions plus room for comments at the end. It should only take a minute.”

    The survey asks users if they found the “Intelligence Document” to be “effective” or “useful” and leaves room for additional comments. 

    Check out the Los Angeles HIDTA second quarter drug price list below.

    A list of drug prices.
    Prices for drugs in Los Angeles according to the Los Angeles High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area program's drug price list. (via LAPD)

    Stay in touch

    Sign up for our free newsletter

    More from L.A. TACO

    What To Eat This Weekend: Cannabis-Infused Boat Noodles, Thai Smashburgers, and “Grass & Ass”

    Plus, a pizza festival and a respected chef from Toluca, Mexico comes to Pasadena to consult for a restaurant menu, including enchiladas divorciadas, and more.

    April 12, 2024

    Facing ‘Immediate Layoffs,’ L.A. TACO Launches Membership Drive to Save Our Publication

    After Sunday, we do not have enough money to make another payroll. We need 5,000 members to become sustainable. Our deadline is April 26th to hit this goal.

    April 12, 2024

    The Final Round of TACO MADNESS 2024 Is Now Open for Voting! It’s Highland Park vs. San Fernando Valley

    It was an incredible comeback to deny last year's winner and bring a first-timer from the San Fernando Valley to the finals. They will have an uphill battle against Villa's Tacos, who lead all teams in total votes so far in the 2024 competition. L.A.'s favorite taco will be decided on Sunday, April 14th, at 11:59 P.M. 

    April 11, 2024

    This New Koreatown Onigiri Spot Is Unlike Any Other in Southern California

    Supamu, which started as a food truck and a series of pop-ups, brands itself as Southern California’s first Okinawa-style onigiri. What sets its onigiri apart from competitors? All the details are in the post, plus where to find it.

    April 10, 2024

    When ‘Tomorrow’ Never Comes: The Saga of a DTLA Bar Staff’s Struggle To Get Paid

    A barback recalled a time when he had to use a payday loan app to cover a dinner bill. “How can you, with a straight face, hand someone a check knowing that there isn’t money in the account,” the barback questioned.

    April 10, 2024
    See all posts